Biodynamic Massage

Biodynamic Massage can be part of the psychotherapy process as one way of working with the body and is also available as a treatment on its own to work with tension and stress, psychosomatic symptoms and to increase body awareness.

Biodynamic Massage reaches for the inner dynamic of a person. Its aim is to establish a harmonious flow of energy throughout the body. It was Gerda Boyesen who brought biodynamic massage to England in 1968, having developed it from methods commonly used in Norwegian Psychiatric hospitals by physiotherapists working in conjunction with psychotherapists.

Holistic Approach

Biodynamic Massage consists of a number of techniques which work specifically with the energy held within the physical structure of the body, from bone and muscular levels to the connective tissue and skin layers as well as the energy field. With its holistic and therapeutic understanding, biodynamic massage is very much part of the Body Psychotherapy tradition and follows and expands basic theoretical principles elaborated by Wilhelm Reich.

Benefits of Biodynamic Massage

It helps to relieve chronic symptoms such as headaches, hypertension, pain, digestive problems, skin complaints, depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

Because of its combined physical and emotional scope, biodynamic massage is especially suited for working with psychosomatic symptoms.

It is effective as a therapeutic approach in its own right, and it is useful in complementing medical treatment or alternative therapies such as homeopathy, acupuncture or osteopathy.

Biodynamic massage is also increasingly being appreciated as an adjunct to psychotherapy or psychoanalysis because it supports and enhances the development of self-awareness.

Insight is anchored through a deeper connection to the sensations and feelings in the body. Your therapist’s permission and support for this process is vital.